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Bioethikos: Bringing Life to Bioethics

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Archive for February, 2015

 

The Legacy of a Pro-Life Pioneer

Sunday, February 22nd, 2015 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan

JCW2

Dr. Jack Willke has passed away at age 89, the great patriarch of the pro-life movement. Here is how he is remembered in the pages of the National Review:

[Dr. Willke] and his wife Barbara dedicated their entire lives to defending the unborn. They were publicly speaking and writing about abortion well before the 1973 Roe v. Wade decision. During the late 1960s and early 1970s the Willkes advised pro-life activists who were trying to block various state-level efforts to expand access to abortion. In 1972, their advice to Michigan pro-lifers to show pictures of aborted babies was crucial to the defeat of a referendum that would have legalized abortion in Michigan. The famous Willke slides of fetal development are still used in pro-life presentations to this day. . .
Dr. Willke’s impact went well beyond the numerous books he wrote and the presentations he made. He was a father figure to many and inspired countless people to become pro-life activists. He was the founder of the International Right to Life Federation and made countless overseas trips to advise and train and motivate pro-lifers in other countries. Here at home, he did important behind-the-scenes work in getting various factions of the pro-life movement to collaborate.

I had the privilege of knowing Dr. Willke, and worked beside him during my years on the board of Ohio Right to Life. Among other things, he taught me how to testify in support of pro-life legislation before House and Senate committees in the Ohio Statehouse. He was a godly man with a humble and charitable spirit. But he fought hard on behalf of the most vulnerable among us.

He was one of my personal heroes, and I will miss him greatly.

National Review Article

Center for Bioethics Launches New Academic Journal

Monday, February 16th, 2015 by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

Smith_Premier_TypewriterPhoto courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

The Center for Bioethics is launching a new peer-reviewed academic journal entitled Bioethics in Faith and Practice: Exploring the Moral Dimension in Healthcare.  From the journal website:

 

Bioethics in Faith and Practice is a new peer-reviewed professional journal, through the Center for Bioethics at Cedarville University. The focus of this new journal is Health Care Ethics, but it will also include articles of a more theoretical nature. Though it will emphasize Judeo-Christian values, we will be open to a large variety of voices, including secular ones. We hope to publish the first issue by July of 2015. After that, it will appear online twice a year.

 

The journal is now open for the submission of new manuscripts.  We are accepting submissions of papers from a variety of perspectives on healthcare-related issues, and hope to represent a diverse spectrum of academic disciplines.  Both applied and theoretical topics are welcome.  For more information on the journal, as well as the “Instructions for Authors”, please follow the link to the journal website below.

We are excited about this new journal, and hope it will serve as a valuable resource to practitioners and academicians alike.

Bioethics in Faith and Practice

 

Is Gene Therapy Playing God?

Monday, February 9th, 2015 by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

Nucleosome1Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

 

by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

It was near the end of the class period, and I was trying to explain the difference between regulating gene expression–how genes get turned on and off– and replacing genes.  “It is possible to modify gene regulation biochemically, using a drug to influence gene expression.  Some chemotherapy drugs work this way.  However, if the gene itself is defective, the most efficient way of fixing it would be to insert a functional copy of the gene into the genome, using some type of vector to get the DNA into the nucleus.  Clinical trials are underway…”

Hands go up.  A few of the expected questions are asked.  How do viral vectors work?  What are the risks of such vectors?  And then a question I hadn’t expected:

“If you fix a broken gene, isn’t that playing God?”

 

It was a good question.  But answering it would’ve deprived my student of an opportunity to think.  Instead, I asked him, “What if someone was born without a limb? Would it be ‘playing God’ if we made that person a prosthesis?”

“No,” answered the student.

“What if it were a biochemical defect? We had a drug that could help return the patient to to normal function, and we gave that to him.  Would that be playing God?”

“No, I’d be fine with that,” he said.

“What if you had the ability to simply replace a defective gene?  It was broken, and you fixed it.  You restored function to your patient.  Assuming that your patient won’t be harmed by the procedure, would gene therapy be any different than the first two scenarios?”

Another student raised his hand.  “When Jesus healed, He restored sight, and made the lame walk.”  Certainly, Jesus restored souls.  But restoring whole persons was an integral part of His ministry.

Restoration belongs to the Creator.  But He has allowed us to steward this gift.  Does it matter whether the tools we use are anatomical, biochemical, or genetic?

 

If Jesus were walking around today, and healed a cancer patient, wouldn’t you expect the mutations in their cancer cells to be gone?

Perhaps medicine will soon be able to do the same thing.  You can read more about gene therapy clinical trials here.

Asking the wrong question?

Monday, February 2nd, 2015 by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

health-care-md

 

(by guest blogger: Erica Graham)

How do we, as a society, decide when someone is mature enough to make their own healthcare decisions?  Recently, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled that 17 year old Cassandra C. must undergo chemotherapy to treat her Hodgkin’s lymphoma, even though she does not wish to receive treatment.  While waiting for the court’s decision, Cassandra was taken into state custody, and confined to a room at Connecticut Children’s Medical center with a guard posted outside her door to prevent her from leaving.  This clear violation of Cassandra’s autonomy has sparked dialogue about when a teen is mature enough to make end of life health care decisions. Currently, teens can legally make some healthcare decisions, like whether or not to get an abortion, without parental consent.  Most of the discussion surrounding Erica’s case has focused on her age and maturity level. Personally, I know 17 year olds who are mature enough to make this decision, as well as some who are not mature enough. Maturity is not simply a matter of age.

So how should maturity be determined in cases like these? I propose an analysis of her reasoning, not her age, should be used to determine her level of maturity. Cassandra’s main reason for not wanting to receive chemotherapy, even though the odds of successful treatment in her case are high, was because she didn’t want to put poisons in her body. Her reasoning, not her age, shows her lack of maturity to make this decision. Her reasoning is not founded on carefully considered risks and benefits like that of a mature adult. It appears her reasons are built on fear and her lack of understanding of a treatment that will most likely save her life. While not every adult is mature enough to consider risks and benefits carefully, the law has the ability, in the case of a teenager, to prevent them from making poor decisions that they may not fully understand.

Certainly some adults refuse chemotherapy, but Cassandra’s case is a different set of circumstances. By undergoing chemotherapy she has an 85% chance of living for many more decades. Basic logic dictates that this benefit overrules the pain and inconvenience of chemotherapy treatments. Despite the fact that this decision violates Cassandra’s autonomy, I am glad the court can intervene when a lack of mature reasoning and logic is evident in a teen. I agree with the court’s decision on the grounds that Cassandra didn’t demonstrate mature moral reasoning.

CNN Article

NBC News Article