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Bioethikos: Bringing Life to Bioethics

Archive for May, 2015

 

Protecting Babies with Down Syndrome

Thursday, May 21st, 2015 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan
L to R: Dr. David Prentice, Edwin Vance (holding photos of son Justin who has Down syndrome), Stephanie Ranade Krider, Jackie Keough, Mary Kate Keough, and Dr. Dennis Sullivan

L to R: Dr. David Prentice, Edwin Vance (holding photos of son Justin who has Down syndrome), Stephanie Krider, Jackie Keough, Mary Kate Keough, and Dr. Dennis Sullivan

Last Tuesday evening, I presented testimony at the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, representing the Center for Bioethics and Ohio Right to Life. I spoke before the Community and Family Advancement Committee in the Ohio House, in favor of H.B. 135, a statute to prohibit abortion solely because of a diagnosis on Down Syndrome. Here is an excerpt from my testimony:

It is highly relevant to our purposes today how we will protect the disadvantaged and vulnerable among us, and how we will prevent genetic discrimination among those who currently have no voice. Seven other states ban abortion for gender selection, and one other state bans abortion for genetic abnormalities. What we are proposing with this statute is rather simple: to protect unborn individuals with Down Syndrome from being killed simply because they have this condition. Anything else is discriminatory. Failure to protect these innocent unborn children is simply eugenics, and it is morally wrong.

 

Please communicate with your state legislators, to encourage them to support and pass H.B. 135, the Down Syndrome Non-Discrimination Act (for my full testimony, click on the link below).

Sullivan HB 135 Testimony

Ohio Right to Life Press Release

Could understanding nature help us treat trisomy?

Monday, May 4th, 2015 by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

21_trisomy_-_Down_syndrome Image Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

by Dr. Heather Kuruvilla

What if we could actually treat the root cause of conditions like Down’s Syndrome, rather than simply ameliorating symptoms?  Although the life expectancy of Down’s Syndrome patients has increased dramatically in the past few decades, and is now approximately 60 years of age, patients continue to experience serious medical conditions such as congenital heart defects, hearing loss, and a susceptibility to Alzheimer’s Disease (National Down Syndrome Society).  Since all of these conditions correlate with the presence of an “extra” 21st chromosome, gene dosage is hypothesized be the root cause of these issues.  So, can we simply turn that extra chromosome off?

In human females with a normal chromosomal composition, somatic (body) cells contain two X-chromosomes.  Normally, in each cell, one X-chromosome is completely silenced.  Recently, scientists have discovered how long, non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) interact with proteins to cause inactivation of the entire X-chromosome.  It is hoped that understanding this mechanism will eventually lead to better treatments of autosomal trisomies, such as the most common, Down’s Syndrome, as well as trisomy 14 and trisomy 18, which are sometimes viable.  According to Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology News:

This information soon may have clinical applications. The Xist lncRNA silences the X chromosome simply because it is located on the X chromosome. However, previous studies have demonstrated that this RNA and its silencing machinery can be used to inactivate other chromosomes, e.g., the third copy of chromosome 21 that is present in individuals with Down’s syndrome.

 

Click here for more information on this discovery.