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Bioethikos: Bringing Life to Bioethics

Archive for July, 2015

 

The Plot Thickens: Newest PP Video is Revealing

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan

Month 7

The Center for Medical Progress has released its second video in a three-year investigative series into the actions of Planned Parenthood (PPFA) and the marketing of fetal body parts. Secretly recorded last February, two supposed research company purchasers talk with Dr. Mary Gatter, a senior PPFA official (CMP Video).

The conversation centers mostly around pricing, and how to modify the abortion technique to produce intact organs. This is very disturbing, and confirms that the first video (featuring Dr. Deborah Nucatolo) was no fluke. This apparently is “business as usual,” with the emphasis on business.

Why this is all so upsetting:

  • The description of second and third trimester abortions is graphic, and shows abortion for what it really is: legally sanctioned dismemberment of human beings.
  • The only issue for Dr. Gatter seems to be what kind of suction to utilize to better preserve intact organs. This is a medical conflict of interest: it’s not about women’s health, but about profiting from the sale of the body parts.
  • Through it all, Dr. Gatter haggles for the best price, even joking about buying a new Lamborghini (expensive sports car). She says, “Patients don’t care what we do, of course.” This just shows the cynical and callous true nature of PPFA (see my earlier blog about the “ugly underbelly” of abortion).

No, Planned Parenthood is not “pro-women,” as they claim. It is pro-business, and anti-life.

CMP Video

Center for Medical Progress

Video Reveals Ugly Underbelly of Abortion

Thursday, July 16th, 2015 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan

baby_in_womb

By now you have probably seen the video (link), or excerpts from it. A hidden camera shows Dr. Deborah Nucatola, Planned Parenthood senior director of medical services, sipping on wine and eating a salad while calmly discussing the removal of body parts from aborted fetuses in a way that maximizes their “value.” She blithely talks about obtaining “intact hearts,” lungs, “intact livers,” and even “lower extremities, that’s easy.” And all of this in a way that seems designed to reassure and impress the two research company “buyers” she’s having lunch with (actually two actors with a hidden video camera).

Pro-life advocates across the nation are understandably upset. It’s hard to count the number of groups that have expressed their outrage: National Right to Life, Americans United for Life, First Things, the National Review — I’m just getting started. In my state, the Ohio Attorney General has called for an investigation, along with AGs and governors throughout the country. I was interviewed for a piece in TheBlaze.com (article link).

In the midst of the shock and hype, we need to find some balance. Was Planned Parenthood really violating federal laws and selling body parts? Here are my reactions:

It’s cynical, crass, and callous, but it’s probably legal. Making donated human tissues available for research does not violate the law. Even the money discussed (“$30 to $100”) is not necessarily an issue, if that is just the cost for processing and / or shipping the specimens. On the other hand, Dr. Nucatola seems awfully interested in making her case to the supposed “buyers.” It may not actually be a business, but it sure looks like she was trying to make a “sale.”

 

I get really disturbed when she recommends that the procedure be done under ultrasound guidance, and suggests modifying the approach to better preserve the removed organs. This is a clear conflict of interest, where commercial concerns trump the care of the woman patient. Even pro-choice voices should condemn this afront to clinical ethics.

Then things take a turn for the worse, when the doctor actually suggests rotating the fetus away from a vertex (head-down) position, in order to better allow for dilation of the cervix so that the head can be delivered intact. This description comes perilously close to intact dilation and extraction, otherwise known as “partial-birth abortion,” now a felony for many years.

 

 

No matter how you look at it, the video provides an opportunity to see the procedure for what it really is: a brutal, degrading, horrific procedure that destroys a human life. This is the ugly underbelly of abortion.

 

 

Balancing Faith and Science at the End of Life

Tuesday, July 7th, 2015 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan

caduce

(by guest blogger Sam Franklin)

My mother, luckily, died in the presence of six of her closest relatives — all of whom were born-again believers. Other patients aren’t as lucky.

Consider “Ms. Ellen,” who spent her last days surrounded only by medical professionals — none of whom affirmed her Christian faith:

Ms. Ellen felt the lack of sensitivity and respect for her faith, but she wanted the entire medical team to know that she knew she would not be living much longer. Why? Because hope for her at this critical moment was not rooted in anticipating a miraculous healing of her body, but in a need for spiritual peace and physical comfort as she approached the end of her life . . .

Unfortunately, Ms. Ellen would be robbed of this opportunity as she quietly lay in her bed, now questioning those more than 21,800 hours of hope-filled moments that she had tucked away over the many years of her life for a time such as this.

 

In my mother’s case, every decision she made reflected her beliefs. Unfortunately, Ms. Ellen’s beliefs influenced none of her medical team’s decisions. Nonetheless, even when patients tragically die alone, a Christian healthcare professional can help final decisions affirm deeply-held beliefs, regardless of their religious background.

Let’s take time to ask patients about their faith and how it impacts their last few days. We shouldn’t force our faith on them, but hopefully, we may have an opportunity to share the gospel. Together, patients and healthcare providers can agree upon appropriate treatment, and in doing so, we address an oft-neglected aspect of patient care: the soul.

NY Times Opinion Piece