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Bioethikos: Bringing Life to Bioethics

New ‘Incentives’ to Choose Death

February 1st, 2017 by Dr. Dennis Sullivan

As we have commented in this blog recently, the American Medical Association (AMA) is thinking of reversing its opposition to physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Canada and five U.S. states have made this practice legal, and “aid in dying” is now a part of everyday medical discussions. Here are a few more reasons to worry about all this:

In January, the Canadian Medical Association Journal published a “Cost Analysis of Medical Assistance in Dying in Canada.” Their conclusion: patients that choose PAS could save the national healthcare system millions of dollars over more expensive palliative care. My colleague Phillip Thompson discusses this issue in his blog here.

 

More grease for this slippery slope comes from the prestigious Journal of Medical Ethics. The December issue features an article entitled, “Organ Donation after Medical Assistance in Dying” (link). PAS may become more attractive for some terminally-ill patients if they could donate their organs. So add the subtle social coercion of doing a “noble” act as another reason to choose PAS. John Holmlund reacts to the trend here.

 

Those who endorse these ideas are acting compassionately, to be sure, but with individual radical autonomy as the underlying principle, rather than an absolute commitment to the sanctity of human life. May God have mercy on all of us as we struggle to find our way in the modern context of managed health care.

One Response to “New ‘Incentives’ to Choose Death”

  1. Dr. Cretella Says:

    How Orwellian that causing the death of a patient is no longer universally viewed as being diametrically opposed to the ancient medical ethics principle of “First do no harm.” Thank you, Dr. Sullivan for a timely and informative post. The links to your colleagues’ articles are likewise appreciated.

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