The Coming of Medical Martyrdom

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March 16, 2015

caduce

Do you remember a time when folks talked about a doctor’s oath, something that dictated his or her ethics? Most don’t realize that this originally came from Hippocrates in about 400 B.C., but they assumed that healthcare was guided by professionalism and compassionate care.

Today, the New Medicine is no longer concerned with the Hippocratic Oath, and we no longer hear much about doctors as healers. Now it is all about individual choice, about radical autonomy run amok. In this modern world of consumer health care, the customer is always right.

So what about those who refuse to play along? What about those doctors, nurses, and pharmacists who refuse to cooperate with patient demands for abortion or for drugs to help them kill themselves? In more and more cases, they are censured by their professional societies, and may even be subject to lawsuits. In Belgium, in the Netherlands, in Australia, in Canada, and now increasingly in the U.S., the highest priority is placed on an individual patient’s choice, and these strictures are increasingly finding their way into our laws.

Wesley J. Smith, a moral philosopher and commentator for the Discovery Institute, puts it this way:

If these trends continue, twenty years from now, those who feel called to a career in health care will face an agonizing dilemma: either participate in acts of killing or stay out of medicine. Those who stay true to their consciences will be forced into the painful sacrifice of embracing martyrdom for their faith.

 

With such assaults on health care rights of conscience, the newest martyrs may be those who wear a white coat.

Wesley J. Smith Commentary

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